Listening

Finished listening to: The Last Leonardo: The Secret Lives of the World’s Most Expensive Painting by Ben Lewis. Read by Peter Noble. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š (Audible) Fascinating. Amazing.

Finished listening to: A Great and Terrible King: Edward I and the Forging of Britain by Marc Morris. Read by Ralph Lister. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š (Audible) Well done, both in writing and the narration. It held up as I hoped.

Currently listening to: On the Nature of Things by Lucretius. Read by Hugh Ross. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š (Audible) Ross, whom I have listened to as Macbeth and also in the “Doctor Who” audio spinoff series “Counter-Measures,” is very good with this. He puts on a voice instead of doing a straight-out read, which threw me for a few minutes at first, and then I got it. It’s written in first person anyway, and Ross’ additional enthusiasm combined with the uniqueness of his voice makes me feel like Lucretius himself is narrating. Given the somewhat snarky tone the text sometimes takes as Lucretius bashes other philosophical deductions, it all works.

And it was written in the first century B.C.? Fascinating – because he just ain’t wrong.

“Nature works with unseen particles.”

”… there is a void in matter.”

Finished listening to: Cannery Row (Classic, 20th-Century, Penguin) by John Steinbeck. Read by Jerry Farden. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š (Audible) I read this many years ago. A very rare case in which I prefer the movie (1982), which I saw first, to the book. But I recently learned the movie is based on both Cannery Row and its sequel, Sweet Thursday, so maybe the element I admire in the movie is from the latter. A good reading by Mr. Farden, who is ideal for the material, and of course it’s a delightful book.

Currently listening to: A Great and Terrible King: Edward I and the Forging of Britain by Marc Morris. Read by Ralph Lister. I like the reader’s rollicking, exuberant approach. Matches the text. We’ll see if this holds up after 18 hours. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š (Audible)

Finished listening to: Princes of the Renaissance: The Hidden Power Behind an Artistic Revolution by Mary Hollingsworth. Read by Karen Cass. The reader’s voice was so enchanting that I have no idea what this book is about. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š (Audible)

Finished listening to: The Fall of Carthage (Cassell Military Paperbacks) by Adrian Goldsworthy. Read by Derek Perkins. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š (Audible)

Finished listening to: Macbeth. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š A good production. Hugh Ross as Macbeth was very good. And heard with the credits at the end: “The porter was David Tennant.”

“Give me your favor. My dull brain was wrought with things forgotten.”

Currently listening to: Princes of the Renaissance: The Hidden Power Behind an Artistic Revolution by Mary Hollingsworth. Read by Karen Cass. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š (Audible)

Recently listened to this fantastic performance of Beowulf by Julian Glover. He even breaks out into Old English for a few lines at a time. ๐ŸŽง ๐Ÿ“š